"COMPLIMENTS THAT AREN’T ABOUT PHYSICAL APPEARANCE

1) You’re empowering.
2) I like your voice.
3) You’re strong.
4) I think your ideas/beliefs matter.
5) I’m so happy you exist.
6) More people should be listening to what you have to say.
7) You’re a very warm hearted person.
8) It’s nice seeing such kindness.
9) You’re very down to earth.
10) You have a beautiful soul.
11) You inspire me to become a better person.
12) Our conversations bring me a lot of joy.
13) It’s good to see someone care so much.
14) You’re so understanding.
15) You matter a lot to me.
16) You’re important even if you don’t think so.
17) You’re intelligent.
18) Your passion is contagious.
19) Your confidence is refreshing.
20) You restore my faith in humanity.
21) You’re great at being creative.
22) You’re so talented at ____.
23) I don’t get tired of you the way I get tired of other people.
24) You have great taste in ___.
25) I’m happy I stayed alive long enough to meet you.
26) I wish more people were like you.
27) You’re so good at loving people."

3:29 p.m. feel free to add to this!  (via expresswithsilence)

28) the way you articulate yourself is so refreshing
29) you have that “brighten-up-a-room” effect
30) you’re just really good to be around
31) you foster my growth
32) you’re really good at dancing!
33) i can share silence with you

(via carlosofthecosmos)

I really love this. I just recently went to a workshop for Girl’s Rock and they were trying to tell us how to communicate with the girls with OUT complimenting them. Which in all reality I have never thought consciously about doing to any person, big or small. But it really does make a difference when you are able to just say something that doesn’t affect physical appearance, or make them feel singled out because of a feature they have that you try and compliment that is different than others’…. these are great :) 

(via cjane)

"A Package from Canada" - An Iphone short.

My first trip to Mother India - A short filmed on an iphone. 

Stuff That I Like, Episode 2- A Superman.

Stuff That I Like - Episode 1 - Control Line Airplanes.

About 5 or 6 years ago, when I was managing an ice rink, my co-worker and now roommate Matt and I would watch “FUEL” a TV Chanel dedicated to action sports. Often times they’d show snowboarding documentaries, and we’d marvel about how awesome it’d be do that. Matt was talking about snowboarding, I was talking about the film making - there’s no way in hell I would jump off a cliff with nothing but a piece of wood strapped to my legs. It was one of the things that helped fuel my early interest in photography and motivated me to keep shooting.

As time went on, I was still interested in making films, but it just wasn’t practical in my head. Until one boring day I decided to tune into an HBO show called “The Neistat Brothers”. A DIY show made on point and shoot cameras by two accomplished short film makers and brothers. I was hooked instantly and busted out my crappy point and shoot camera. The results were not good. I was convinced that even though they were shooting on similar cameras to mine, they possessed some god-given talent and being located in New York they had way more interesting opportunities to film. Even more, they had an HBO budget behind them and could fly anywhere in the world since the money wasn’t needed for expensive camera crews. Even though they were filming on cheap point and shoot cameras, I focused on the gear and their budget. Surely that was the key. What I failed to realize is that at the time they were given the short-lived show, they had made literally hundreds of short films. In short - They paid the iron price - they had won their skill through constant trial and error, making films. I’ll bet a lot of them sucked at the beginning.

It’s easy to look back and realize now, but I was dumb then. I gave up on film making and focused on photography, and got pretty decent at it.

A few years later, I discovered Andrew Roger’s project “Ingrained” and asked him about helping out on shoots. I finally had purchased a DSLR with video capabilities but had no clue what I was doing. Andrew invited me to a LoveDrunk session - Lovedrunk being a project where a band performs a song while a team of video and audio engineers capture it, the final video is a single take filmed from 3-9 cameras. I learned a lot that day, and ended up sticking around after and shooting the shit with Andrew and the creator of Lovedrunk, Django Greenblatt-Seay. Over the next few years these two men would become good friends, mentors and help shape both my career and life. I still learn something new from them just about every time we hang out.

During that time, Casey Neistat continued to make his quirky short films, only now he was releasing them on youtube. He finally started to get recognition for his work, and in a big way. Several of his videos have gone viral and have several million hits. Most people don’t know the name “Casey Neistat” but when you show them one of his films you almost always hear “Oh I’ve seen this”. He’s still one of my biggest sources of inspiration.

Recently, Casey has been creating films using Snapchat. That’s right, the mobile app. Even though these videos are shot 10 seconds at a time, on a cellphone in portrait mode, they’re still wonderfully crafted stories. At the same time I’ve been lusting over a Sony FS-700, a $7,700 camera (that price tag doesn’t even include a lens). I’ve decided that before I consider purchasing this camera I need to take some time and work with low-fi tools, and that’s why for the entire month of July I am going on a film-making Spree. A large part of that will be to create films using my lowest quality tools, a crappy point and shoot I bought for $25, my Iphone 4s and a GoPro Hero 3 (black edition). I’m not terribly sure what’s to come of it, but I’m excited about the possibilities.

Watch me do a sink load of dishes super fast.

I made this video for my church for Gay Pride. I think it’s neat.

retrogasm:

“For hours she danced and sang and flirted and did this thing that’s—she did Marilyn Monroe. The white wine helped things along. Then there was the inevitable drop … she sat in the corner like a child, with everything gone. I wouldn’t photograph her without her knowledge of it. And as I came with the camera, I saw that she was not saying no.”

–Richard Avedon 1957

Avedon captured Norma Jean and she was even more beautiful…

  1. Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark III
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/1600th
  4. Focal Length: 213mm